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Where All the Presidential Candidates Stand on Marijuana

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Hillary Clinton, Democrat, former Secretary of State from New York

Although she said she never smoked it (unlike her husband who said he never inhaled), Clinton said she thinks it should be available under certain circumstances and has urged more research on its benefits.

Where New York stands: Non-smokeable medical marijuana legalized in assembly bill signed into law July 2014.

Lincoln Chafee, Democrat, former Rhode Island Governor

Signed a bill decriminalizing marijuana in 2013. Would consider legalizing it depending on what happens in Colorado.

Where Rhode Island stands: decriminalized marijuana in 2013, making possession of less than an ounce of pot punishable only by a $150 fine.

Bernie Sanders, Independent U.S. senator from Vermont running as a Democrat

Supports medical marijuana, open to legalizing marijuana for recreational use.

Where Vermont stands: Legalized in 2004.

Jeb bush, Republican former Governor of florida: Opposes legalization but says it should be up to states to decide.In an appearance at the Conservative Political Action Conference in February, however, Bush said that while he opposes marijuana legalization, it should be up to the states to decide.

“Allowing large-scale, marijuana operations to take root across Florida, under the guise of using it for medicinal purposes, runs counter” to efforts to make Florida “a world-class location to start or run a business, a family-friendly destination for tourism and a desirable place to raise a family or retire,” Bush said.

In Florida: Medical marijuana remains illegal after the 57 percent of voters who, in November 2014, said yes to a constitutional amendment allowing it fell short of the 60 percent needed to pass. Bush opposed the initiative.

Ben Carson, Republican, retired neurosurgeon from Detroit

OK with medical marijuana use, not recreational.

Where Michigan stands: Legalized in 2008.

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Chris Christie, Republican, N.J. Governor

The most outspoken opponent of marijuana, which he calls a gateway drug, Christie – recreational use will never be legal in N.J. as long as I’m governor – said he will go after recreational users in Colorado and Washington, the only two states where its use is legal.

Wants treatment, not incarceration, for drug and alcohol addiction.

Where N.J. stands: although legalized in January 2010, disagreement over details of the house bill delayed the first dispensary from opening until Dec. 2012. Patients cannot grow their own marijuana.

Ted cruz, Republican, Texas Senator

Opposes it but switched positions on whether it should be up to states. Once lambasting the Obama administration for not interfering when Colorado and California chose to ignore criminal law, now believes it should be up to states.

Where Texas stands: Bill introduced in state senate died in committee June 1, 2015.

Carly Fiorina, Republican, former business executive

Doesn’t want medical marijuana legalized but believes states have rights to do what they want.

Where California stands: Was the first state to legalize it with Proposition 215 in 1996.

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Lindsey Graham, Republican, South Carolina Senator

Does not support legalization or states’ rights to legalize.

Where S.C. stands: Illegal.

Mike Huckabee, Republican, former Arkansas Governor

Against legalization; states’ rights stance unclear.

Where Arkansas stands: Signatures being collected for 2016 ballot initiative.

Martin O’Malley, Democrat, former Maryland Governor

Changed his opinion that legalizing it would undermine the public’s desire to combat drug violence when he acknowledged the vast majority of people place a low priority on marijuana crackdown.

Where Maryland stands: legalized it effective June 2014.

George Pataki, Republican, former New York Governor

Believes in states’ rights to legalize it.

Where New York stands: Non-smokeable medical marijuana legalized in assembly bill signed into law July 2014.

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Rand Paul, Republican, Kentucky senator

Co-sponsor of bipartisan bill that would end the federal ban on medical marijuana, allowing “patients, doctors and businesses in states that have already passed medical marijuana laws to participate in those programs without fear of federal prosecution.”

Where Kentucky stands: Not legal. Bills died in committee in March 2015.

Rick Perry, Republican, former Texas Governor

Supports decriminalization. He was the governor of Texas in 2014 when he told Jimmy Kimmel, “You don’t want to ruin a kid’s life for having a joint.”

Where texas stands: Bill introduced in state senate died in committee June 1, 2015.

Marco Rubio, Republican, Florida Senator:

Opposes but up to states

Only non-euphoric type. He told times: “If there are medicinal uses of marijuana that don’t have the elements that are mind-altering or create the high but do alleviate whatever condition it may be they are trying to alleviate, that is something I would be open to,” he said.

Now do states have a right to do what they want? They don’t agree with it, but they have their rights. But they don’t have a right to write federal policy as well. It is, I don’t believe we should be in the business of legalizing additional intoxicants in this country for the primary reason that when you legalize something, what you’re sending a message to young people is it can’t be that bad, because if it was that bad, it wouldn’t be legal.

In Florida: Medical marijuana remains illegal after the 57 percent of voters who, in November 2014, said yes to a constitutional amendment allowing it fell short of the 60 percent needed to pass. Rubio opposed the initiative. In interview with Hugh Hewitt.

Rick Santorum, Republican, former Pennsylvania Senator

Believes in states’ rights to legalize but federal rights to keep illegal drugs out of the country.

Where Pennsylvania stands: Bill working its way through statehouse.

Scott Walker, Republican, Wisconsin governor

Although he believes Wisconsin is a gateway drug, he thinks it should be up to states to decide.

In Wisconsin: Not legal. No pending legislation.

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