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South Carolina Lawmaker Has A Unique Idea for Celebrating 4/20, Missouri Advocates Collect Enough Signatures to Get Adult-Use Marijuana on the Ballot, and Ohio Updates Medical Marijuana Labeling Requirements

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South Carolina Lawmaker Has A Unique Idea for Celebrating 4/20

Last week, Democratic Representative JA Moore introduced a bill for South Carolina to celebrate the unofficial cannabis holiday 4/20 in a unique way. The legislation would create a “420 Day” for the state, which would require the Department of Probation, Parole and Pardon Services to issue pardons for a minimum of 20 percent of individuals who have completed their sentences for simple possession of marijuana on April 20th each year. Only those with simple possession of marijuana convictions would be eligible to be pardoned. The measure, known as H.7614, has been passed to the House Judiciary Committee for review. 

Missouri Advocates Collect Enough Signatures to Get Adult-Use Marijuana on the Ballot

Advocate group Legal Missouri has officially collected enough signatures to get their constitutional amendment on the ballot this year. They say they have collected 200,000 signatures – more than the 170,000 required – but still plan to collect thousands more. Their ballot initiative would permit those 21 and older in the state to use, possess, and grow cannabis. The measure would also impose a 6 percent sales tax on all cannabis products to generate state revenue. The state legislature is also currently considering a bill that would preempt Legal Missouri’s measure and create a broader adult-use legalization law. 

Ohio Updates Medical Marijuana Labeling Requirements

Beginning May 2nd, medical cannabis producers in Ohio will be required to list THC isomers and the minor cannabinoids THCA and THCV on product labels. The new labeling requirements do not prohibit any products containing the minor cannabinoids or THC isomers; they must be measured and added to package labels as part of the product’s “Total THC”. Many medical cannabis producers and companies already include this information on their labels. But, they will not be able to use any abbreviations, such as “delta-8” or “D-8”. This change will also allow the use of cannabinoids derived from hemp in medical marijuana products, which was previously prohibited. 

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