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Visitors in DC Can Legally Buy MMJ Without an Out-of-State Card, A New Study Says Individuals Who Use Psychedelics are More Connected to Nature, and U.S. Virgin Islands Senator Files Legislation to Legalize Cannabis

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AP

Visitors in DC Can Legally Buy MMJ Without an Out-of-State Card

Washington DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed new legislation earlier this month that will allow visitors to the District to legally purchase medical marijuana without an out-of-state registration card. The new law could increase sales for medical cannabis dispensaries in DC. Vistors that do not have an out-of-state card can apply for a temporary non-resident one from the district’s Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration (ABRA). The temporary cards cost $30 and are only valid for 30 days, however, the cards can be re-issued once they expire. Currently, the ABRA has reciprocity agreements with medical cannabis programs in 38 U.S. states and territories.  

A New Study Says Individuals Who Use Psychedelics are More Connected to Nature

A recent study says that individuals that use psychedelics like psilocybin tend to be more connected to nature and knowledgeable regarding climate change. These characteristics tend to be indicative of a more pro-environmental stance as well. The international study was conducted by researchers at the University of Innsbruck in Austria and the University of Zurich in Switzerland and was published in the journal Drug Science, Policy, and Law. The researchers wanted to examine the relationship between how a person relates and connects to nature and their use of psychedelics. To help make the study more subjective, study authors used a knowledge-based test instead of relying on self-reporting from the survey participants. 

U.S. Virgin Islands Senator Files Legislation to Legalize Cannabis 

A Senator in the U.S. Virgin Islands has filed two pieces of legislation to legalize cannabis and expunge the records of those with past marijuana-related convictions. Senator Janelle Sarauw said the review of her bills was complete, clearing the way for them to be filed. She hoped to include lessons already learned from U.S. states that legalized cannabis. The senator said in a press release, “It has been a very cumbersome process to get these bills to where they are today.” The bill would create the regulatory framework for a legal cannabis market for the territory, should it pass. It would establish an Office of Cannabis Regulation which would be in charge of issuing licenses and overseeing the industry.